Monday, 18 December 2017

4 Things to Consider When Choosing a Music School in India

People we know are always asking the question "How do we choose a Music School or Music Institute for our child?" and after extensive research and talking to several parents of students attending music lessons, we have compiled 4 things that you must look into when choosing the right place for your child's Music Education.


#1 - Quality of Music Education

The first thing we must understand that music is a language just like English, Hindi, Russian and others. The school you pick must teach the music alphabets, then onto reading and writing music. All musical concepts such as pitch, melody, rhythm must be taught. The student must begin with the fundamentals of music and then build upon that with songs and other musical pieces.

Students must be able to read and play music NOT learn a tune by-heart. If a student does not know the fundamentals of music then a student will be unable to learn more songs/pieces as they go forward. Ensure your child is being taught correctly. Ask the schools how they teach music.


#2 - Curriculum & Infrastructure 

Curriculum - A music institute will typically follow either a contemporary or classical curriculum. You need to understand the difference between the two.  Classical Music is music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western music. While a more precise term is also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 (the Classical period), during which, this type of music was created. Noted Classical music composers include Mozart, Beethovan, Bach, Vivaldi etc. Contemporary Music is the current music (30-60 years) and covers all the modern genres including Rock, Pop, Jazz, Funk, Country etc.

Infrastructure - A good music institute will invest a certain amount of funds in providing the right infrastructure for students to learn in. Quality instrument(s), acoustically treated room(s) and brightly lit classrooms are a must. In some institutes, the student will be required to carry their instrument, this is alright as long as the required infrastructure to learn to play is provided - for example, notation stands, instrument stands, benches etc:





















#3 - Quality of Teachers

A good music institute will go the extra mile to ensure that they have good teachers who are qualified to teach what they are hired for. For instance, a guitar teacher must be certified in a renowned curriculum (Rockschool, Trinity, ABRSM) for guitar. In addition, a teacher must be trained and familiar with the curriculum being followed at the music institute. For beginner students, you must have a teacher who has completed their Grade 3 or 4. For intermediate to advanced students, you must have a teacher who had completed their Grade 7 or 8 or holds a Diploma in music.


#4 - Policies, Terms of Operation

Last but not the least, every company operates in their own manner under certain policies. You must read and understand their terms of functioning thoroughly before enrolling the student in any music institute. However, we often find that if a school is strict with its policies, they tend to deliver better quality services. Find the right balance between the quality of services and their terms of operation.

We hope these 4 points are useful to help you make an informed decision about how to choose the right music school for yourself or your child. Don't compromise on a good school because of distance, time and price - if you can help it. It will really go a long way in learning music and setting the foundation correctly.



BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.

Tuesday, 10 October 2017

What is the Best Age to begin Piano Lessons?

The benefits of learning music and playing musical instruments enhances your, ability to learn, memory, happiness, discipline and so much more! Music Education enriches the lives of so many children and it is the best gift a parent could give their child.

As music educators, we are often asked 'What is the best age for my child to begin piano lessons?'. Although there is no exact age to begin instruction, in our experience the best age is between the ages of six and eight. 

You may come across the occasional YouTube videos of children as young as three years playing complicated Mozart sonatas but that doesn't mean every 3 year old is ready to learn the Piano.


Children under the age of six who show an interest in the piano should be allowed to explore and learn on their own time table. They won’t always respond well to an adult-imposed learning structure. Always active and curious, a toddler might pay attention to an adult who is trying to teach them something for about three minutes, but then they notice something else they want to check out. If you put a child at this age in piano lessons, most of the teacher’s time will be spent in redirecting the child’s attention to the piano. It just isn’t a very effective use of your time and money.

Instead, parents of children under age six should be doing things to cultivate a general interest in music. Singing and listening to recorded music are things you can do at home with children at any age. Also, consider enrolling your child in a good preschool music program, like BlueTimbre's Junior Music Program (JUMP). This program build awareness of musical concepts like rhythm and pitch, musical alphabets, music notes, music appreciation and introduction to musical instruments and lays a good foundation for learning a musical instrument.

So, How do you know if your child is ready?

  1. Size of Hand - Can your child easily place five fingers on five adjacent white keys? For some five-year-olds, that’s a big stretch! Before beginning piano lessons, make sure your child’s hands have grown enough to be comfortable using a keyboard.
  2. Finger Independence - Before beginning piano, children need to be able to move individual fingers. A child who can use three different fingers on three black keys to play is ready for lessons. A child who can only play by picking out the tune with one finger is probably not ready.
  3. Interest in Music and Desire to Learn - Probably the most important thing on this checklist is your own child’s desire to learn the piano. If the motivation to learn comes from your child, it will help them overcome all sorts of difficulties they might encounter. If the motivation only comes from you, then sooner or later you’ll end up with a power struggle.

If you’re a teen or an adult beginner, you might get frustrated and want to give up because you feel awkward at first. It may seem easier to stick with the things that you’ve already mastered. If that happens, remember, you are doing this because you want to! Don’t give up. Be patient with yourself as you learn the piano. You’ll feel like a little child all over again. Set aside twenty minutes a day and enjoy that process of learning something completely new. If you can find thirty or forty minutes a day, you’ll progress even faster.

BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.



Source
https://www.hoffmanacademy.com/blog/best-age-to-begin-piano-lessons/

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Understanding Vocal Vibrato

Several beginner or amateur singers often question the need for Vibrato. So, what is Vibrato and what is the Importance of Vibrato?

"Vibrato" is the modulation of pitch in the voice.

It's a soft, narrow, rapid fluctuation of the pitch of the notes while singing.

"Tremolo" is the modulation of volume in the voice.

Using real tremolo in singing is not a standard technique



Singing with vibrato is something that many professional singers learned to do in the era before amplification was invented and became widespread and practical (in all the years before about 1925). The idea of singing with a band without vibrato, which used to be called crooning (that was originally a derisive term) only became practical if you assumed the use of a microphone and amplification on stage, or in the case of recording the singing voice in a recording studio.
Vibrato is essential to operatic singing because using vibrato is part of the technique which enables a solo singer to be heard, unamplified, singing with a 40 piece orchestra in front of an audience of 2,000 people. Using vibrato also enables a singer to sing very loud and project clearly for a considerable amount of time without fatiguing or injuring the voice. You can't do that without vibrato.

Of course some pop singers who do not use vibrato develop a permanently raspy, weak voice (think Tom Petty or Bob Dylan). They like it that way, and some way or another they learn how to keep using their voice that way. It is different with every singer; they each develop their own technique and sound which works for them.

Healthy vibrato can be achieved in a rather short period of time. Usually the time factor is dependent upon the singer's mind/body coordination. Some singers have more of a connection to their body than others. any singer can achieve a properly regulated and even vibrato with concentration, proper instruction, and by embracing the process rather than the result. Patience is a most important aspect while training and balancing vocal production.

BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.



Source
https://music.stackexchange.com/questions/29355/what-is-the-importance-of-vocal-vibrato
http://www.voiceteacher.com/vibrato.html

Wednesday, 30 August 2017

Music Advocacy - Music and Your Mood

Just how does music affect our mood? And how can we use music and rhythms to experience a better, more fulfilling life?

Music. It makes us smile; it excites us and makes us dance; it brings us to tears. A simple piece can bring back a memory in full relief; we actually feel we’re there. And it can change our mood within minutes – or instantaneously.

Are you sad, depressed, or anxious maybe? You will be glad to know that you can chase all the blues away just by listening to your favorite music. 

Because of our unique experiences, we develop different musical tastes and preferences. Despite these differences, there are some common responses to music. Babies love lullabies. Maternal singing is particularly soothing, regardless of a mom’s formal musical talents or training. 

Music, Attention & Learning

Everyone who has learned their ABCs knows that it is easier to memorize a list if it is set to music. Scientific research supports common experience that pairing music with rhythm and pitch enhances learning and recall. Music helps children and adolescents with attention problems in several ways. 



Music, Anxiety & Stress

Considered as a natural antidepressant, music can give you the euphoric high that antidepressant medications can bring. So if you are looking for a great way to end your terrible day, read on to learn more about how music can uplift your mood almost instantly.

Music’s beneficial effects on mental health have been known for thousands of years. Ancient philosophers from Plato to Confucius and the kings of Israel sang the praises of music and used it to help soothe stress. Military bands use music to build confidence and courage. Sporting events provide music to rouse enthusiasm. Schoolchildren use music to memorize their ABCs. Shopping malls play music to entice consumers and keep them in the store. Dentists play music to help calm nervous patients. 

Modern research supports conventional wisdom that music benefits mood and confidence. Rhythm and tone can have a definite impact on your happiness – and on your life. Listen to the right set of tones and you can begin to feel the effects more quickly than you’d ever dreamed.



BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.



Source
http://www.healthline.com/health-news/mental-listening-to-music-lifts-or-reinforces-mood-051713
https://www.consciouslifestylemag.com/music-and-the-brain-affects-mood/
https://examinedexistence.com/how-music-changes-your-mood/
http://bestbinauralbeats.org/how-music-affects-our-mood/
https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/emotional-wellness/Pages/Music-and-Mood.aspx
http://www.hindustantimes.com/health-and-fitness/here-s-why-music-affects-our-mood-emotions-the-way-it-does/story-QxXKOJYANFGE25X2NBxLrK.html
https://sites.psu.edu/siowfa16/2016/10/02/does-music-affect-our-moods-significantly/

Saturday, 12 August 2017

Guitar Warm Up Exercises

Every professional guitarist starts a session the same way: by warming up.

Whether you’re playing a gig or recital, planning a monstrous practice session, or preparing to impress your friends at home with your killer chops, a precursory limbering up session is mandatory. A thorough warm-up will help bring your playing to peak level and prevent hand injuries

Warm up exercises that can help you to gain fluency, speed and accuracy on the guitar neck. It's a good idea to do some of these exercises every day. Don't do them too long at a time, it's better to exercise regularly (daily) for a short time.

Here are a few methods we recommend to get your hands and fingers warmed up!

You gain the most out of these exercises if you use a metronome. Start slow and built up the speed. Don't force yourself into a tempo that you're not ready for. Make sure your arms and wrists are relaxed. Failing to do so may result in a RSI like tendinitis (wrist inflammation).


Warm Up Exercise

This first exercise helps to develop your fluency, speed and left hand-right hand coordination. Start slow and build up the speed. Use fingers 1, 2, 3 and 4 of your left hand, don't skip the little finger. Use a pick and do alternate picking. The exercise doesn't stop at the end of the tabs, continue for the rest of the neck. Be RELAXED!






The next exercise trains your individual fingers. First do the exercise with fingers 1 and 2. Next round use fingers 2 and 3. Then use fingers 3 and 4. Do the exercise up to the 12th fret and for those of you who can't get enough of it, back from the 12th to the first. And remember: RELAX!




String Skipping Exercises

The following set of exercises train your picking abilities.



This is one of bass player John Patitucci!




The next exercise uses the G major scale. When you reach the last note on the tab, don't stop, but go back.


As you progress, more exercises can be added to this mix. Warm up exercises are very important and not doing them regularly can cause long term damage. Make sure your instructor or Music School is certified and professional. 





BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.


Source
http://www.jazzguitar.be/guitar_technique.html
http://www.guitarplayer.com/lessons/1014/warm-up-time-11-exercises-that-will-help-you-play-even-better/53942

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Drum Rudiments - Single Stroke Roll

Learn How To Play The Single Stroke Roll Drum Rudiment!

The single stroke roll is the drum rudiment everyone should learn how to play first. If you’ve been playing drums for some time now but have not began learning the 40 drum rudiments, chances are you’ve already applied the single stroke roll to your drum beats and drum fills without knowing about it.
This drum rudiment consists of alternating strokes played between the hands – R (right) L (left) R L R L…or L R L R L R…in case you’re left hand dominant. No matter the hand you start playing it with, it’s important you learn how to execute the single stroke roll leading with both hands.



Don’t rush the process of learning how to play any of the 40 drum rudiments, just so you can get to the drum beats and drum fills. Taking your time with each step of the learning process will actually make you a better drummer. Focus on quality and not on quantity.

As you practice any of the 40 drum rudiments, sit in front of a mirror so you can check your posture, stick heights and even the way each hand plays a stroke of a given rudiment. This is like having a drum teacher watching you play, evaluating your performance and making corrections. When in front of a mirror you’re your own drum teacher. Be demanding with yourself as a teacher would. Try making things sound and look as perfect as possible. Remember to practice with a metronome, have a lot of patience and just keep playing and having fun. With time you’ll become the drummer you aspire to be. You just have to keep at it.

Once you can play the single stroke roll comfortably on a single surface (practice pad, snare drum) you can move on to learn how to apply it to the drum set. On exercise #1, start by playing a 16th note single stroke roll on the hi-hat. Once you have that down, take the leading hand off of the hi-hat to hit the snare drum on counts 2 and 4. Add the bass drum on counts 1 and 3 and you’re set.


On exercise #2, the bass drum pattern is the same as the one on the previous drum beat. However, the 16th note single stroke roll is a lot more broken up between the hi-hat and the snare drum. Keep the weaker hand close to the snare drumhead so you can play very soft ghost notes on the “e’s” and “ahs” of each count. The leading hand is on the hi-hat playing 8th notes on the “ands” and on counts 1 and 3. On counts 2 and 4 move that hand to hit accented strokes on the snare drum.



Exercise #3 is the first drum fill on this 40 drum rudiments free video lesson. The idea for this drum fill is to keep a single stroke roll going around the drums. Start on the snare and move down your toms, playing four strokes per drum.


The last drum fill on this 40 drum rudiments free drum lesson is a variation on the previous one. Instead of starting the drum fill on count 1 of the second bar start it on count 3 – this is known as a half-bar drum fill. Hit the snare drum first and move down your toms, playing two strokes per drum.



Once you’re able to play the single stroke roll and the exercises herein accurately, you can move on to further expand your knowledge of the 40 drum rudiments. If you want to keep studying single stroke based drum rudiments, we encourage you to move on to learn how to play the single stroke four. In case you want to learn a new type of basic rudimentary stroke, then the double stroke roll is the best next thing for you to learn.



BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.





Source

http://www.40drumrudiments.com/single-stroke-roll/

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

How to Sight Sing Efficiently

What Is Sight Singing?

Sight singing is sight reading for singers. When singers sight read, they need to think about three factors at once:

    •      The rhythm
    •      The pitches
    •      The words

Rhythm, Pitches, Words

When you practice sight reading, words are not very important; sing “la la la” if you have to. Pitches, while important, are not as important as the rhythm in sight singing. If you sing the wrong pitches and the right rhythm, you’ll know exactly where you are in the music and be able to catch yourself, even if it sounds bad. If you sing the wrong rhythm, on the other hand, you’re in danger of losing your place in the music and having to stop.

Orient Yourself

Check out the key signature. What key are you in? Is it a major or minor key? How many beats are in each measure? Is there a tempo marking?



Scan

Quickly scan the piece to root out surprises. Is it in mixed meter? Are there tempo changes? Any hidden high notes? This is all helpful information.

Get Your Note

Play the opening chords, or at least your first note, on a piano. The more information you and your ears have, the better.

Tap the Beat

Establish the beat for yourself by tapping it on your leg or collarbone. This will help you stay in rhythm when things get crazy.

Think Solfege

If you know what key you’re in, you should know where the movable ‘do’ is If you know where ‘do’ is, identifying ‘so’ and other key notes becomes easier. Thinking in solfege helps many singers sight read more accurately.



BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.





Source
http://www.jamminwithyou.com/nyc/musicblog/topic/sight-reading

http://takelessons.com/blog/sight-singing-practice-z02

Thursday, 27 July 2017

Loss of Our Favorite Musicians

Be it the recent loss of Chester Bennington of Linkin Park, Chris Cornell of Soundgarden, Leonard Cohen, David Bowie, Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane, Chuck Berry, Glen Frey, Prince and so many other legends we grew up listening to - The death of our favorite musicians makes feel a great sense of loss.

What we’re experiencing is the passing of an entire generation of true artists – men and women who worked within the medium of music the way a sculptor works in marble. Can you imagine a world not influenced by the Beatles and Bowie? One without shimmering brass sections, psychedelic guitars and dense keyboard solos? Would anything remain but computer-generated beats and Auto-Tune?  Is there even anyone active in popular music right now who could begin to write the score for a string section? What about a Top 40 band that can approach the sublime harmonies that the unjustly maligned Eagles deliver on “Seven Bridges Road“? Will any rocker ever again reach the rarified air of critical acclaim and universal mainstream appeal that Bowie and the Beatles reached?


This alone provides ample reason to grieve when social media lights up with the tragic news that another pioneer has left us. But I suspect that the death of musical craftsmanship constitutes a small fraction of why we mourn these losses.

Musicians and Fans are connected in an intangible way that a casual listener simply cannot understand. These people we don't know somehow spoke to us directly. The lyrics of our favorite songs take us on a emotional journey that no one can fathom. As David Grohl (Foo Fighters, Ex-Nirvana) once said "That's one of the great things about music. You can sing a song to 85,000 people and they will sing it back for 85,000 different reasons."

While we mourn the loss of a life, we’re also mourning the loss of something inside us. We’ve got to pull the shade down on many happy memories that now sting just a little. And we have to watch the vibrant color these artists brought into our lives drift out of sight like a balloon that slipped from our grasp just a moment before we were ready.




BlueTimbre is a Music Company with Music Education spaces, Jam Room and Recording studio located in Whitefield, Bangalore, India. BlueTimbre provides complete end-to-end Music Education solutions for schools. The BlueTimbre team comes with decades of cumulative experience in running structured businesses, music curriculum development, music education and performance.




Source
www.diffuser.fm
personal emotion

Picture Credits: 
http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/t/touring-exhibition-david-bowie-is/
http://www.billboard.com